PennDOT, Capital Area Transit, City of Harrisburg Highlight Public Transit Options

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Capital Area Transit and Harrisburg Mayor Eric Papenfuse announced new safety improvements to the Market Square Transfer Center and public transit options in the Harrisburg region.

The Market Square Transfer Center, located near the Hilton in downtown Harrisburg, now has improved signals and signage, ADA ramps and a new crosswalk at 2nd Street driveway entrance, updated bus loading zones, leaning rails, and new bus shelters.

“This project will make pedestrians and riders safer at the Market Square Transfer Center,” said PennDOT Deputy Secretary of Multimodal Transportation Jennie Granger. “It will improve accessibility and protection for all riders and enhance the overall travel experience.”

The improved sign and signal adjustments were added to ensure motorists do not make right turns on red from the east-shore bus lane on to Market Street eastbound. Illuminated Pedestrian warning signals were also added to indicate that a bus may be approaching.

Five ADA ramps, three crosswalks and chains to keep pedestrians within crosswalks were also added to minimize mid-block crossing.

“Ultimately, it’s about advancing mobility for the riders in our region,” says Richard Farr, CAT Executive Director. “Safety projects like these not only benefit Harrisburg residents, but the region as a whole, and we will continue to put safety first.”

New leaning rails will separate the CAT customer area from the neighboring M&T Bank building, while replacement of all six existing bus shelters created an opportunity to repurpose the old ones within city limits.

Finally, existing brick pavers were re-set to provide a smoother surface for pedestrians and bus lane operations and various electrical updates were made on devices in the area.

“I am very pleased to see these safety improvements at the Market Square Transfer Center,” said Mayor Papenfuse. “The project, which included upgrades to the traffic signal, bus shelters, and ADA compliant ramps, has greatly enhanced pedestrian safety in that area.”

The total cost for construction was approximately $840,000 in state transportation funds.

In addition to supporting connections to intercity transit service, Pennsylvanians are reminded that shared ride programs are available in every county and fixed-route transportation systems statewide offer accessible transportation. The commonwealth provides both Lottery and Act 44 funds to subsidize these trips for seniors and individuals with disabilities every day.

In addition to trips for medical appointments, shopping and other activities of daily life, these services can also be used for transportation to vaccination appointments. Shared ride services can transport residents to mass vaccination sites or any site where a vaccine is available to individuals, including pharmacies, hospitals and doctor’s offices. Free transportation to vaccinations may also be available for qualifying individuals.

Additionally, the Senior Shared Ride program enables all individuals age 65 and older to use curb-to-curb shared ride services and pay only a small portion of the regular shared ride fare. Individuals with disabilities ages 18-64 may access transportation through the Persons with Disabilities Program.